• Jessica Flannery

    Biography:
    I am a 4th year clinical psychology doctoral student. I work jointly between a developmental stress neurobiology and prevention/intervention lab and a developmental social neuroimaging lab. I'm interested how stress, the gut and the brain interact with each other and the environment across development to help us better understand mental and physical wellbeing of children and adolescents. When I'm not asking kids for their spit or hair (to measure stress), poop (to measure the gut), or a brain scan, a few things I enjoy are: coffee, nature, sunshine (and rain- I do live in Eugene after all!), and adventures with my two puppies , friends, and fiance.
    Interests:
    Development, Neuroscience, Stress, Gut Microbiota, Context, Adolescence, Social Support
  • Sarah Horn

    Biography:
    I am a graduate student in clinical psychology at the University of Oregon. My research interests center on the impact of early adversity on neurobiological mechanisms across the lifespan. Specifically, I am investigating immunological disruptions in the context of early life stress and seeking to establish stable biomarkers of stress. Further, I am invested in integrating multifaceted neurobiological approaches into intervention-based research paradigms and exploring the effects of interventions on stress responsivity systems in pediatric populations. After completing my B.A. in 2013 at the University of Michigan, I worked as a Clinical Research Coordinator at the Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program and World Trade Center-Health Research Program at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.
    Interests:
    early life stress, adversity, immune, stress systems, trauma, neglect, health, intervention, oxidative stress
  • Kathryn Beauchamp

    Interests:
    early life stress, translational neuroscience, inhibitory control, developmental plasticity, stress neurobiology
  • Leslie E. Roos

    Interests:
    Stress, Child Development, Psychopathology, Maltreatment, Autonomic Physiology, Neuroscience